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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 4
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
. >> it's an amazing epilogue because morgan buys -- owns everything. they sell it to a boston book seller for a thousand bucks. it sits in the basement, treasures of this boston store for almost 40 years. they rediscover hit in the '70s and start to be distributed widely. that's why you see curtis pictures everywhere now. even the "new york times" sells curtis pictures right now. (laughs) >> brown: all right. the book is "short nights of thed that doe catcher, the epic life and immortal photographs of edward curtis." timothy egan, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, jeff. >> sreenivasan: you can see more of edward curtis's photographs online. we've linked to a collection at northwestern university that includes the entire 20-volumes called "north american indian." >> sreenivasan: and finally tonight, on this day when americans gather to break bread together. we take a second look at a food story far from the u.s. china's growing appetite for meat and dairy products is driving big changes there in everything from farming to food safety. our story is part of our "food for 9 billion" se
and mitt romney in boston. former congressman discussed close house and senate races. tom davis and martin frost talk to an audience at this event hosted by the bipartisan policy center for an hour and 20 minutes. >> good morning. and the senior fellow here at the bipartisan policy center. likeaction de all of us who are former members think back nostalgically and how we relate to these things personally. i know tom and martin have great stories to tell and we're fortunate to have too great effective, insightful, and intelligent former members and we will moderate the elections. it went to make a couple of comments. we were on a panel for foreign diplomats. most of the campaign discussion was about obama and romney. someone asked me if there was no discussion of the congressional races. as a matter in america who is elected to congress, it really hit me. i think the answer is yes. as a former nine-term house member i was troubled by the question. i could understand it because most of the discussion concerns they presidential race. i am convinced that the founding fathers were making a clea
just about to go in and then you said sorry [ bleep ]. >> joining us now from boston, the moderator of "meet the press," david gregory. as we take a live look at the white house. >> did you see this? >> oh. >> david gregory, the guy that found you out in the streets in l.a. playing stickball and took you in and said kid, you can be a star one day, jeff zucker, right here. hired at cnn. that's exciting for jeff, isn't it? >> it is. it's cool. >> absolutely. absolutely. he'll do good things. >> that's all he has to say. that's all he's got to say. >> i think we're all thrilled for jeff. >> okay. that's all he's got to say. >> wow! >> he's a company man. he's a company man. >> all right. >> no, you know, he doesn't want to upset phil. you know, buddy, you can't talk about, you can't say. >> phil gets upset. >> he gets upset. >> he gets really hurt. he gets emotional. >> we can't have jeff doing too well, right? >> no. >> i know. >> did you hear what phil said? >> what about phil say? >> about zucker. he's just turned on him. just vicious. >> really? >> hateful diatribe. >> oh, no. out
in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
problems and stop all the nonsense. martha: michael graham, radio talk show host and "boston herald" columnist and he written about this. he joins me this morning. michael, good to have you with us. melissa: my choice is easy. martha maccallum for person of the year. martha: we're done. melissa: i'm kidding. i'm kidding. martha: i could go on and on about my huge impact on 2012. stick with what your column says. go ahead. so you want -- >> i choose bill o'reilly if we're going to do that. martha: i'm sure he will not dispute you there. he will have no argument about that. melissa: i agree with his premise. in a way it is interesting we live in amazing moment. we have $99 trillion of unfunded debt in social security, medicare, government pensions we see there we see the middle east on fire with the rising tide of the most disturbing element in the middle east, that is people who are willing to mix religion and violence together who are on the rise of the saw in egypt with the new constitution. yet in this moment of great import we're talking seriously about gangnam style and jay-z an
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
heard from mitt romney on his campaign charter heading into boston last night. he thought he was going to win too. he said he had no regrets and was proud of his campaign. but as for why this campaign went down in defeat, that adviser tells me that they are pointing to what the obama campaign was predicting, they were going to have a good turnout in the word of the adviser, the obama campaign was right. as for the future of the republican party, i talked to a top conservative leader inside the republican party who said the gop will have to do a better job talking about immigration reform with latinos if they have any hopes of winning a presidential election in the near future. john? >>> presidential race is settled, but we're still looking at key races to determine the final numbers for the balance of power in the united states senate and the house of representatives. our chief congressional correspondent dana bash is with us for breaking news in north dakota. >> cnn can project the democratic candidate for senate, heidi heitkamp, in north dakota, has won that seat. she's kept that sea
on the relationship." host: also next to that story is a story from "the boston globe." "kerry considered as possible defense chief." "the president is considering asking john kerry to join the national security team." host: so, that is the latest on that. also this morning, "nancy pelosi considers leaving post as house democratic leader." "the decision could come as early as tomorrow, wednesday." washington journal will be live from capitol hill tomorrow with several lawmakers from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. to keep you updated on what is happening this week in washington. the looming fiscal cliff, that is what we are talking about with all of you today. how do we avoid it, should entitlement spending be part of the package? james, go head. caller: i had to retire because of back problems or whenever, but i do not get disability, i would not apply for it, it is an entitlement. it is ludicrous to ask people in my age bracket, people who pay for their medicare -- that is what people are not saying. we paid for it for a long time. many of us are sick, we are not asking for anyone to help us along. we a
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)